From Waste to Watts: How Sewage Could Help Fix India’s Water, Energy and Sanitation Woes

As India’s summer intensifies, many states are already in the midst of a drought—and the hottest days have yet to arrive. At the same time, water-intensive agriculture, rapid urban expansion, increases in industrial activity and growing energy production are driving the country’s water demand upward. More than half of India is now considered severely water stressed.

Part of the problem is that India still manages its water as an infinite resource on a linear model of withdrawal, consumption and disposal. But a more efficient management model is to look at water from a “circular economy” perspective. Water’s usability doesn’t need to end once it washes down the drain. Rather, we can see industrial and domestic wastewater as a valuable resource from which usable water, nutrients and even renewable energy can be extracted.

Canada Firm Uses Salt, Tesla and Flywheels in Clean Energy Race

Canadian firm is hoping to cash in on the burgeoning market for electricity storage — no matter which technology breaks out first.

NRStor Inc. is positioning itself to be the go-to distributor, developer and operator of lithium-ion batteries, magnetically-levitated flywheels and other technologies seeking to solve the age-old question of how to save electricity for later use. The Toronto-based company is the only distributor of Tesla’s Powerwall residential battery in Canada and is working to turn a giant salt cavern into a compressed air energy storage system.

Battery technology is advancing swiftly, largely driven by Elon Musk’s Tesla Inc. At the same time, other methods are being refined that can be used to store energy for even longer periods of time. The global market could expand to around $20 billion by 2024, from around $600 million in 2015, according to U.S. firm Navigant Research.